en zh es ja ko pt

Departments

Events & Exhibitions

The calendar that follows is updated bimonthly as of the 15th of each of January, March, May, July, September and November. Most institutions listed have further information available through the World Wide Web. Please reconfirm dates and times before traveling. Readers are welcome to submit information for possible inclusion in this listing through the Feedback page. (Please note in the subject line, "Events & Exhibitions.")

July

Concentrations 57: Slavs and Tartars. Slavs and Tartars is an art collective whose installations, lecture performances, sculptures and publications result from an unconventional, research-based approach. The group identifies the “area east of the former Berlin Wall and west of the Great Wall of China known as Eurasia” as the focus of its multidisciplinary practice. In this exhibition, the group presents new work from its current series, “Long Legged Linguistics,” an investigation of language as a source of political, metaphysical and even sexual emancipation, using its trademark mix of high and low culture to address the thorny issues of “alphabet politics”: the attempts by nations, cultures and ideologies to ascribe a specific set of letters to a given language. The exhibition includes original works in Persian, Russian, Turkish, Georgian and English presented in a series of sculptures, installations, textiles and printed matter. Dallas Museum of Art July 27 through December 14.

August

Ordinary Lives: Photography by Rania Matar. Captures the mundane activities of everyday life amid the political and social turmoil of post-war Lebanon. The energy and determination of Matar’s subjects are dramatically conveyed in a series of 28 images, which depict the bond between mother and child, the camaraderie of friends and the resilience of ordinary people—and of their country. Arab American National Museum, Dearborn, Michigan through August 31.

September

Ghosts, Spies and Grandmothers: SeMA Biennale, Mediacity Seoul 2014. Ghosts, Spies and Grandmothers: SeMA Biennale, Mediacity Seoul 2014 invokes the word ghost to call on spirits whose presence has been erased by dominant historical narratives. It uses spy to allude to the experience of colonialism and the Cold War in Asia. Grandmothers are living witnesses who have endured the ages of ghosts and spies and who demonstrate once again that women bear the brunt of the harm caused by colonialism and war. Under that title, the biennale views Asia as a moving target, a cognitive lens and a region that is much more complex than its stereotypes, and includes work by artists from Arab and western countries as well as Korea. Seoul Museum of Art and Korean Film Archive, Seoul, Korea September 2 through November 23.

String of Pearls: Traditional Indian Painting. Presents manuscript paintings from different parts of India and surrounding regions and highlights their interrelationships, analogous to pearls on a string. The paintings were inspired by musical and literary sources, historical events and various religious traditions; viewed together, they offer a glimpse into the richness of Indian painting during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. The exhibition bursts with figures bedecked with precious gems, often including spectacular garlands of pearls; besides personal ornamentation, such decoration often contained symbolic meanings to communicate either specific ideas or messages from the wearer to the beholder. Harn Museum of Art, Gainsville, Florida through September 14.

Explorations: Egypt in the Art of Susan Osgood. Explorations: Egypt in the Art of Susan Osgood is an eclectic joining of art and archeology in contemporary art, highlighted by the artist’s drawings of coffins from KV63, the first new tomb to be discovered in Luxor since the uncovering of Tutankhamen’s tomb in 1922. An artist for the University of Chicago’s Epigraphic Survey in Luxor, Osgood produced travel sketchbooks and four series of paintings and prints, all inspired by ancient graffiti, early maps and more than 30 years in Egypt and beyond. University of Coimbra Science Museum, Portugal through September 14.

Empire, Faith and War: The Sikhs and World War One. Tells the story of the disproportionately large role played by Britain’s Sikh community in “the Great War.” Though Sikhs were only two percent of the population of British India at the time, they made up more than 20 percent of the British Indian Army in 1914, gaining commendations and a reputation as fearsome and fearless soldiers. Brunei Gallery, soas, London through September 28.

Another Day. Another Day features documentation of Palestine by photographer Sara Russell laid out as a narrative, unfolding just as did the photographer’s experience. IHRC Bookshop and Gallery, Wembley, UK through September 30.

October

Unraveling Identity: Our Textiles, Our Stories. Unraveling Identity: Our Textiles, Our Stories unites textiles from across the globe to explore expressions of individual, cultural, political and social identity through the ages. In all times and places, clothing, adornments and other fabrics have articulated self and status, from ethnicity and occupation to religious belief. The exhibition, the first in the museum’s new venue, features more than 100 pieces that span 3000 years and five continents. Textile Museum, Washington, D.C., Fall 2014. through October 1.

Abstraction into the World. Abstraction into the World is a pairing of exhibitions that interrogates architecture, the urban environment and the natural world, placing abstraction in dialogue with these contexts. Tracing the careers of Piet Mondrian and Nasreen Mohamedi—artists working in different eras and continents—the exhibit explores how each arrived at similar nonfigurative styles, suggesting correspondences between their practices and a parallel interest in bringing abstraction into reality. Exhibiting Mondrian and Mohamedi together, “Abstraction into the World” creates an unprecedented dialogue between Indian and European modernism through the lens of abstraction in relation to urban and natural environments. Tate Liverpool through October 5.

Serendipity Revealed: Contemporary Sri Lankan Art. . Brunei Gallery, soas, London October 9 through December 20.

Saturated: Dye-Decorated Cloths from North and West Africa. Saturated: Dye-Decorated Cloths from North and West Africa celebrates the dyer’s art from North and West Africa, including Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Côte d’Ivoire, Nigeria and Cameroon. The exhibition presents 11 dye-decorated cloths produced by traditional techniques and worn as garments or accessories. Before the introduction of European-made printed textiles to Africa in the 19th century, textile designs were made with natural dyes on plain homespun cotton, wool, raffia or other materials. Women were most often the dyers, and dye-decorated cloth was a major form of feminine artistic expression. Dallas Museum of Art through October 12.

Princely Traditions and Colonial Pursuits in India. South Asian artistic traditions were dramatically transformed by the political, social and economic changes that accompanied India’s transition from local to colonial rule in the 19th century. Artists formerly patronized by Indian princes came to work for English officials and merchant elites, adjusting their practices to suit their new patrons’ tastes. English artists and expatriates introduced new genres and pictorial styles to India, while foreign demand for Indian luxury items brought about esthetic transformations in textiles, silver and other goods. The exhibition explores a complex and fascinating visual history. Los Angeles County Museum of Art through October 12.

The Future Is Not What It Used to Be: The 2nd Istanbul Design Biennial. The Future Is Not What It Used to Be: The 2nd Istanbul Design Biennial considers “the manifesto” as a platform and a catalyst for critical thinking in design. It asks how 21st-century designers can use the manifesto not only in the production of texts but also through actions, services, provocations or objects with the goal of inciting inventive outcomes. Of 800 submissions from Turkish and international designers, curator Zoë Ryan selected 75 that imagine a new future and instigate change by building on and reinterpreting history. They include “LEPSIS: The Art of Growing Grasshoppers” by Mansour Ourasanah, which addresses the implications of a growing world population and imminent global food shortage, and “Alternative Bug Out Bags”—kits for short-term evacuation after a disaster—by Jessica Charlesworth and Tim Parsons. Galata Greek Primary School and other locations, Istanbul, October 18 through December 14. October 18 through December 14.

Now Read This. This exhibition comprises 45 works by 39 contemporary artists of international background and reputation from the collection of Driek and Michael Zirinsky. The works are united by their use of textual elements, their textural granularity and their inclusion of textile references and components. Just as text, texture and textile all share a common root (the Latin textus means woven), these works all invite the viewer to bring a reader’s close level of examination to their encounter with the work. Featured artists include Ghada Amer, Xu Bing, Hildur Bjarnadottir, Mel Chin, Annabel Daou, Ala Ebtekar, Olafur Eliasson, Markus Hansen, Dinh Q. Le, Robert Longo, Sherry Markovitz, Ulrike Palmbach, Kathryn Spence and Xiaoze Xie, among others. Boise State University Arts Gallery through October 20.

L’avenir (looking forward) . L’avenir (looking forward) shows work by 50 artists and collectives from 22 countries as BNLMTL 2014— La Biennale de Montréal. It combines a multi-site venue, a series of performances, film screenings, talks, tours, publications, conferences and other special events at the Musée d’art contemporain and other cultural institutions and public spaces throughout the city to examine how contemporary artists give form to the question of “what is to come?” Multiple locations in Montréal October 22 through February 4.

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (San Franciso). Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. An eye-opening look at the largely unknown ancient past of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, this exhibition draws on recently discovered archeological material never before seen in the United States. Roads of Arabia features objects excavated from several sites throughout the Arabian Peninsula, tracing the impact of ancient trade routes and pilgrimage roads stretching from Yemen in the south to Iraq, Syria and Mediterranean cultures in the north. Elegant alabaster bowls and fragile glassware, heavy gold earrings and Hellenistic bronze statues testify to a lively mercantile and cultural interchange among distant civilizations. The study of archeological remains only really began in Saudi Arabia in the 1970’s, yet brought—and is still bringing—a wealth of unsuspected treasures to light: temples, palaces adorned with frescoes, monumental sculpture, silver dishes and precious jewelry left in tombs. The exhibition, organized as a series of points along trade and pilgrimage routes, focuses on the region’s rich history as a major center of commercial and cultural exchange, provides both chronological and geographical information about the discoveries made during recent excavations, and emphasizes the important role played by this region as a trading center during the past 6000 years. Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, December 18 through March 9; Nelson Atkins Museum, Kansas City, April through July 2014; Asian Art Museum of San Francisco October 24 through January 18.

Jerusalem Show VII (‘Ala Abwab Al Janna). Jerusalem Show VII (‘Ala Abwab Al Janna) encompasses exhibitions, film screenings, performances, talks, walks and workshops showcasing works of Palestinian and international artists, presented in the Old City of Jerusalem in various indoor and outdoor venues. Jerusalem October 24 through November 7.

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. An eye-opening look at the largely unknown ancient past of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, this exhibition draws on recently discovered archeological material never before seen in the United States. “Roads of Arabia” features objects excavated from several sites throughout the Arabian Peninsula, tracing the impact of ancient trade routes and pilgrimage roads stretching from Yemen in the south to Iraq, Syria and Mediterranean cultures in the north. Elegant alabaster bowls and fragile glassware, heavy gold earrings and Hellenistic bronze statues testify to a lively mercantile and cultural interchange among distant civilizations. The study of archeological remains only really began in Saudi Arabia in the 1970’s, yet brought—and is still bringing—a wealth of unsuspected treasures to light: temples, palaces adorned with frescoes, monumental sculpture, silver dishes and precious jewelry left in tombs. The exhibition, organized as a series of points along trade and pilgrimage routes, focuses on the region’s rich history as a major center of commercial and cultural exchange, provides both chronological and geographical information about the discoveries made during recent excavations and emphasizes the important role played by this region as a trading center during the past 6000 years. Asian Art Museum of San Francisco October 24 through January 18.

Istanbul. Istanbul is the third and most ambitious edition of The Moving Museum. With a three-month residency program for 40 international artists, it marks the largest coordinated influx of international resident artists in Istanbul’s recent memory. Among the artists are 12 from Turkey who will anchor the period of dialogue that features a public program of events, talks, workshops, lectures and performances. These will take place in the warehouse that will serve as residency headquarters and house a digital program directed by artists Jeremy Bailey, right, Joe Hamilton and Jonas Lund. Each artist has been commissioned to participate in local projects as well: While making an enduring impact on the city, they will also bring new influences to their current and future collaborators as well as themselves, furthering the museum’s focus of expanding local conversations to international audiences. At the end of October, the residency will culminate in an exhibition. Founded in 2012 by Aya Mousawi and Simon Sakhai as an independent, non-profit organization, The Moving Museum is a traveling program that aims to strengthen relationships among local art scenes and the global community of contemporary art. The word “moving” is not only attributed to the museum’s physical space, but is described as its “intention to advance contemporary art and its institutions.” Previous work includes exhibits in London and Dubai. Multiple locations, Istanbul. through October 31.

November

Places of Memory. Places of Memory at The Pavilion of Turkey at the 14th Venice International Architecture Biennale explores the biennale theme “Fundamentals”by departing from three areas of Istanbul that acted as thresholds during different stages of curator Murat Tabanlioglu’s life. This is the first year that Turkey is presenting at the International Architecture Exhibition in its new long-term pavilion at the Arsenale, Venice. Arsenale, Venice through November 23.

Kader Attia. Kader Attia, the renowned French–Algerian artist, unveils a new site-specific commission. The work revisits the biblical story of Jacob’s Ladder with a towering floor-to-ceiling structure of rare artifacts and books. Hidden inside this library is a cabinet of curiosities filled with items ranging from old scientific measuring devices to books by such authors as Descartes and Alfred Russel Wallace. At the center of the work, a beam of light shines up to a mirrored ceiling. Attia’s multimedia installations reflect on anthropology, politics and science and are rooted in history and archival research. His works explore ideas around identity in an age of globalization. Whitechapel Gallery, London through November 30.

Ancient Lives, New Discoveries . Introduces visitors to eight people from ancient Egypt and Sudan whose bodies have been preserved, either naturally or by deliberate embalming. Using the latest technology, the exhibition builds up a rounded picture of their lives, their health, their occupations and how they died, all in the Nile Valley over a span of 4000 years—from ancient Egypt to Christian Sudan. The individuals on display include a priest’s daughter, a temple singer, a middle-aged man, a young child, a temple doorkeeper and a woman with a Christian tattoo. British Museum, London through November 30.

Platform 007. Platform 007 is an online project space discussing the future of arts infrastructures and audiences across North Africa and the Middle East, sponsored by Ibraaz, the critical forum on visual culture. Initiated by the Kamel Lazaar Foundation in 2011, it publishes an online, biannual Platform with monthly rolling content, in both written and video formats. Platform 007 is a stage for the interpretation and dialogue around self-organized, socially engaged art practices and how they contribute to, and go beyond, a culture of institutional frameworks for art. www.ibraaz.org/platforms/, through November.  www.ibraaz.org/platforms/ through November 30.

December

Divine Felines: Cats of Ancient Egypt. Presents 30 artworks selected from the museum’s extensive Egyptian collection: feral and tame cats, stone or bronze cats, small or large cats, domestic or divine cats. The exhibition explores the role of cats, lions and other felines in Egyptian mythology, kingship and everyday life, where they were revered for their fertility, associated with royalty and valued for their ability to protect homes and granaries from rats and mice. On public view for the first time is a gilded leonine goddess dating from between 770 and 412 bce that entered the Brooklyn collection in 1937. Brooklyn Museum, New York through December 31.

January

The Rainbow Behind the Black: 100 Years of Saudi Arabian Dress and Accessories. Brunei Gallery, soas, London January 1 through March 31.

In Remembrance of Me: Feasting with the Dead in the Ancient Middle East. In Remembrance of Me: Feasting with the Dead in the Ancient Middle East explores how the living and the dead interacted to commemorate ancestors in the ancient Middle East. More than 50 artifacts document how food and drink were regularly offered to nourish the dead in the afterlife and how two- or three-dimensional effigies preserved the memory of the deceased. The exhibition was motivated by the 2008 discovery of a stela in eastern Turkey that dates to about 735 bce; it commemorates an official named Katumuwa. The lengthy text carved on it reveals that, in that region, the soul of the deceased was thought to actually dwell in the stela and needed to be cared for by the living. Other exhibits examine commemoration of and communication with the dead and different conceptions of the soul in ancient Egypt, Iraq and Israel/Palestine. Catalog. Oriental Institute Museum, Chicago through January 4.

April

Egypt’s Mysterious Book of the Faiyum. Egypt’s Mysterious Book of the Faiyum is an exquisitely illustrated papyrus from Greco-Roman Egypt, one of the most intriguing ancient representations of a place ever found. The papyrus depicts the Faiyum Oasis, located to the west of the Nile, as a center of prosperity and ritual. For the first time in over 150 years, major sections owned by the Walters Art Museum and the Morgan Library & Museum, separated since the manuscript was divided and sold in the 19th century, will be reunited. Egyptian jewelry, papyri, statues, reliefs and ritual objects will illuminate the religious context that gave rise to this enigmatic text, which celebrates the crocodile god Sobek and his special relationship with the Faiyum. Reiss-Engelhorn-Museen, Mannheim, Germany through April 15.

June

Pearls on a String: Art and Biography in the Islamic World (San Francisco). Pearls on a String: Art and Biography in the Islamic World presents the arts of Islamic cultures from the point of view of authors and artists from historical Muslim societies, offering an alternative to impersonal presentations of Islamic art. Instead, the exhibition focuses on specific people and relationships among cultural tastemakers threaded together “as pearls on a string,” a Persian metaphor for human connectedness—especially among painters, calligraphers, poets and their patrons. The exhibition highlights the exceptional art of the Islamic manuscript and underscores the book’s unique ability to relate narratives about specific people. Through a series of vignettes, the visitor is introduced to the art inextricably linked to the men and women who shaped the Islamic past and contribute to its future. Asian Art Museum, San Francisco June 21.

September

Pearls on a String: Art and Biography in the Islamic World (Doha). Pearls on a String: Art and Biography in the Islamic World presents the arts of Islamic cultures from the point of view of authors and artists from historical Muslim societies, offering an alternative to impersonal presentations of Islamic art. Instead, the exhibition focuses on specific people and relationships among cultural tastemakers threaded together “as pearls on a string,” a Persian metaphor for human connectedness—especially among painters, calligraphers, poets and their patrons. The exhibition highlights the exceptional art of the Islamic manuscript and underscores the book’s unique ability to relate narratives about specific people. Through a series of vignettes, the visitor is introduced to the art inextricably linked to the men and women who shaped the Islamic past and contribute to its future. Museum of Islamic Art, Doha, Qatar September 1.

November

The Invisible Hand. “The Invisible Hand,” a work by the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Ayad Akhtar, will be presented in the 2014-2015 season of the New York Theatre Workshop. The play is about an American stockbroker kidnapped by Islamic militants; his perspective on his captors evolves as he negotiates for his release. New York Theatre November 1 through December 31.

December

Marvels and Mirages of Orientalism: Benjamin-Constant in His Time. Marvels and Mirages of Orientalism: Benjamin-Constant in His Time presents an acclaimed painter of the Belle Époque in a major exhibition of Orientalist art. The artist’s huge, spectacular canvases, now traveling for the first time, conjure up fantasies of a dreamlike Orient, viewed through the prism of folklore, ethnographic pretext and the erotic imagination. Benjamin-Constant’s dazzling color palette was greatly influenced by his trips to Andalusia and Morocco. Perspective is provided by paintings by artists of his time, from Delacroix to Gérôme, and reactions to his work by contemporary artists. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts through December 1.

March

Pearls on a String: Art and Biography in the Islamic World. Pearls on a String: Art and Biography in the Islamic World presents the arts of Islamic cultures from the point of view of authors and artists from historical Muslim societies, offering an alternative to impersonal presentations of Islamic art. Instead, the exhibition focuses on specific people and relationships among cultural tastemakers threaded together “as pearls on a string,” a Persian metaphor for human connectedness—especially among painters, calligraphers, poets and their patrons. The exhibition highlights the exceptional art of the Islamic manuscript and underscores the book’s unique ability to relate narratives about specific people. Through a series of vignettes, the visitor is introduced to the art inextricably linked to the men and women who shaped the Islamic past and contribute to its future. Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, Maryland March 19.

November

True to Life: New Photography from the Middle East. True to Life: New Photography from the Middle East is an exhibition of contemporary photographs by internationally acclaimed artists from the Middle East that encourages visitors to question the “authenticity” of what appears to be represented in photography and explore what is real, staged or imaginary. Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery, UK through November 2.